<h1>Blog & News</h1>
January 4, 2011

Future Promises Helps Pregnant and Parenting Teens Build Promising Futures

by Women's Fund

By: Heather Hafer
Public Relations Coordinator, Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County

Future Promises is a school/community-based program that offers education and support to pregnant and parenting teens to help them build their own promising future. This program helps young families stay in school and graduate from high school, have a healthy pregnancy and healthy baby, be a good parent and develop healthy relationships with others, and continue their education beyond high school.

Referrals are accepted by calling 317-221-3190. School guidance counselors or the school nurse can make referrals.

Future Promises offers:

Individual Assistance and Support, including:

  • Staying in and graduating from high school
  • Enrollment in college or vocational school
  • Finding reliable childcare
  • Obtaining quality and appropriate health care
  • Housing and home life issues
  • Paternity issues
  • Employment
  • Public assistance
  • Alternative educational programming to earn a GED
  • Emotional support
  • Grandparent support

Weekly Educational Seminars, including topics on:

  • Your pregnancy and newborn journey
  • Parenting education and skills for young mothers and fathers
  • Pregnancy prevention education
  • Improving communication and relationship skills

Out of School Activities, such as:

  • Back to school picnic
  • Winter holiday celebration
  • College tour
  • Year-end awards dinner
  • Support during labor and delivery by certified doulas

Incentive Programs, such as:

  • Earn incentive points for good grades and school attendance
  • Use inventive points to purchase items for self or child at the Incentive store
  • Annual college scholarship
  • Awards for high grades, good school attendance and other positive behaviors

Future Promises held its annual Christmas Party on December 11 at Charles A. Tindley School. Program participants and their families were invited to have their photos taken with Santa, play games, eat a free lunch and—best of all—shop in the Incentive store.

Program participants earn incentive points throughout the school year for good grades and attendance and are able to use these points to purchase items for themselves or for their child/children in the incentive store (pictured right), set up for the day at Tindley. The store was generously stocked with toys, diapers, toiletries, clothes, car seats, bounce seats and more. Participants were able to earn incentive points the day of the party for getting tested for STDs. They received points for each family member or friend in attendance who was tested as well. The Marion County Public Health Department offered the STD screenings.

Participants lined up outside of the incentive room, where they were given empty boxes for shopping, and as soon as everyone was in line, the doors opened and they rushed in to begin shopping. There was no shortage of supplies to be had! Everyone walked away with arms full of supplies.

“This program is such a blessing,” said one participant, who was due with her first child in December. “It really is helpful."



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5 Comments

Carolyn Meagher
Monday, May 11
Dear Ms. Span-Roddy,
Laksmi Hasanadka of Project Home Indy suggested I contact you.

I am Carolyn Meagher with IU School of Medicine, Adolescent Pediatrics. I am overseeing a research project to better understand how adolescent parents make medical decisions regarding their children’s health and how they use adults in their lives as decision-support people. The project is conducted by Dr. Mary A. Ott (maott@iu.edu) of the IU School of Medicine.

I am seeking young parents to interview as part of phase 1 of this project.

Phase I of the project entails interviewing adolescent parents in a 60-minute interview. The interview has three parts: 1.) general questions about the young parent of support person, such as age, gender and family; 2.) what medical decisions they have made for their child; 3.) questions about a hypothetical medical decision involving a possible surgery. Young parents, age 14-21 can participate. Parental permission is not required, and participants can sign their own consent form. Participation is voluntary. There is no direct benefit to the participants in this study, but young families will have the opportunity to reflect on their own parenting and decision making processes.

Participants will be given a $20 gift card as compensation for their time. The project has been approved by the IU Institutional Review Board. The project has special protections for privacy and confidentiality. If a participants feels uncomfortable, they can choose to stop at any time. Choosing to stop is okay and will not affect anyone’s medical care.

I am writing to see if it would be possible to recruit young parents from Future Promises. I have a flyer and Information sheet that I can share with you.

Carolyn Meagher
Research Assistant
Section of Adolescent Medicine
Indiana University School of Medicine
cgmeaghe@iu.edu
317/278-9362
melissa
Thursday, March 5
I would like some information on pregnant teen residential living.
Sanchillia Warren
Wednesday, September 17
I am looking for assistance with maternity clothes, baby supplies
Kathy
Friday, May 31
looking for schools for just pregnant teens
Hope
Monday, May 30
Future Promises was absolutely the best part about high school for me... beyond any other organization that I was a part of, any team, anything. I was given the chance to prove that I was more than just a teenage mother, but instead, an individual that was striving for success. Flash forward two years since graduation, I STILL miss FP and wish that I could have that support group following me around in college. It only gets harder. Future Promises will forever be a passion in my heart and I hope that someday I can be a part of the committee in helping young, teen parents make it and graduate with flying colors!